>>>The rhythm of the Troll’s Ladder

The rhythm of the Troll’s Ladder

Eleven 180-degree hairpin bends and a gradient of 9%: The vertiginous road that links the Norwegian town of Åndalsnes with the village of Valldal twists as much as it climbs; its name, Trollstigen, means ‘Trolls’ Path’. The steep and narrow road is 106 km long and winds through mountains and deep valleys, passing spectacular fjords and waterfalls. The road can only be used when weather permits, meaning it is closed during the winter.

The photographer Alejandro Villanueva had to make three trips before the fog would allow him to film. The artist’s aim was to pay homage to some of Norway’s architectural icons in a series of time-lapses called ‘Iconic Norway’. In this case, the protagonist is the Trollstigen Visitor Center, standing on the highest point of the road. ‘The biggest challenge of the shoot was, as you can imagine, the weather. I had to secure the tripod to the ground with a cable otherwise the wind would blow it off as it once did’. Despite the impetuosity of the weather, Villanueva managed to capture the beauty of the surroundings and its leisurely pace, both during the day and at night.

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